Monday, February 28, 2011

My Slides for the Web24Business Brainstorm #w24brainstorm

A couple of days ago I gave a talk about (some of) my Enterprise 2.0 experiences at the Web24Business Brainstorm. Saskia Lammers of the Temporary Art Center Eindhoven (TAC) was also invited to speak. She told about her work in developping a new social website that would support the community of artists. It was interesting to see the idea of the website consisting mostly of content from elsewhere, like Facebook, Youtube, etc.

My 20-minute presentation gave a short overview of the work that was done in Océ in the Enterprise 2.0 space. And some of my insights. Here are my slides:


And, as always, comments are more than welcome!

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Ask Not...?

Ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country.

Yep, Kennedy. I heard this inspiring quote a couple of days ago while watching an interesting documentary about Ronald Reagan. It struck me how much this quote relates to social media. Social media is not about waiting for others to come to you, but you going to them by serving them. Social media is not about taking, but giving. Social media is not about shouting, but listening first. It's about asking, not stating. Etc.

Although humans are deeply social, I do think we have to reminded regularly that this is true. And live up to that fact. At least this quote helped me remember.

Monday, February 14, 2011

Are You Coming to the Intranet Conference? #intra11 #intranet

I just wanted to make some noise for one of the largest Intranet conferences in the world. I've been there twice (to give a breakout session) and can say this conference is one of the best I've ever attended. The location is great, the people are super, the content is inspiring, the food is good, etc. This year I'm one of the organizers of the conference and I hope we can live up to the expectations... ;-)

Are you coming to the Intranet Conference (Dutch: Congres Intranet)? I hope you are. You can find the program here in English or Dutch. I think we have really nice list of keynote speakers. Dion Hinchcliffe, Jane McConnell, Martin White and Tony Byrne. Big thinkers and inspiring speakers in the intranet space. As the program shows, we're taking a bit broader approach to intranet than the previous years. So we'll focus on the traditional intranet, but also on social intranet, social media, enterprise 2.0 and social business.
Peter Hinssen will lead us through the day and I'm sure his experience and humor will give us a great time together.
The set of breakouts we set up are very interesting as well. They help you relate to your specific situation, focusing on different market segments, intranet approaches and platforms

Please leave a comment if you're coming. And also leave a comment if you're not coming. I'd love to hear why.

By the way, if you want to get an impression of the 2009 and 2010 conference, please read these posts (2009 and 2010).

Thursday, February 10, 2011

Understanding Social Media Concepts 2

Not too long ago I built on a very interesting post and wrote about understanding social media concepts. A couple of days ago another very interesting post was written about this topic: Malcolm Gladwell, Your Slip Is Showing by Brian Solis. This post looks at social media from a sociological angle. A must-read for understanding social media. Enjoy!

Wednesday, February 2, 2011

Understanding Social Media Concepts

This is a really good post: It’s Not Twitter or Facebook, It’s the Power of the Network! In workshops that I give about social media I always try to stress the fact that the underlying concepts of social media are more important to understand than the (popular) tools like Twitter. The tools will come-and-go, but the underlying concepts are here to stay, in my opinion. And they'll continue to evolve as well.
The above-mentioned post underlines this as well, responding to the claims that Twitter etc have caused the turmoil in Tunesia, Egypt, etc. Some quotes from the post:
The real trigger for the uprisings, they argue, is simply the frustration of the oppressed Egyptian people — which is undoubtedly true. But it also seems clear that social media has played a key role in getting the word out, and in helping organizers plan their protests. In the end, it’s not about Twitter or Facebook: it’s about the power of real-time networked communication. (...)
But is anyone really arguing that Twitter and Facebook caused the revolutions in Tunisia or Egypt, or even the earlier public uprisings in Moldova or Iran for that matter? Maybe cyber-utopians somewhere are doing this, but I haven’t seen or heard of any. The argument I have tried to make is simply that they and other social media tools can be incredibly powerful, both for spreading the word — which can give moral or emotional support to others in a country, as well as generating external support — as well as for organizational purposes, thanks to the power of the network.
Keep this in mind the next time you talk and think about social media and change. I hope this helps!
Comments are welcome, as always!